ESWC 2017 – Trip Report

Between 28th of May and 1st of June 2016 the 14th Extended Semantic Web Conference took place in Portorož, Slovenia. As part of the CrowdTruth team and project, Oana Inel presented her paper written together with Lora Aroyo in the first day of the conference. More about the paper that was presented can be found in a previous post. In the last day of the conference, Lora was the keynote speaker.

The Semantic Web group at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam had other great presentations. During the Scientometrics Workshop Al Idrissou talked about the SMS platform that links and enriches data for studying science. During the poster and demo session people were invited to check SPARQL2Git: Transparent SPARQL and Linked Data API Curation via Git by Albert Meroño-Peñuela and Rinke Hoekstra. Furthermore, the Semantic Web group had a candidate paper for the 7-year impact award “OWL reasoning with WebPIE: calculating the closure of 100 billion triples”, by Jacopo Urbani, Spyros Kotoulas, Jason Maassen, Frank van Harmelen and Henri Bal.

Keynotes

I’ll start by writing a couple of words about the keynotes, which covered this year a high range of areas, domains and subjects. In the first keynote presentation at ESWC 2017, on Tuesday, Kevin Crosby, from RavenPack, stressed the importance of data as a factor in decision making for financial markets. In his talk entitled “Bringing semantic intelligence to financial markets”, he focused on the current issues related to data analytics in decision making: the lack of skills and expertise, the quality and completeness of data and the timeliness of data. However, the most important issue is the fact that although we live in the age of data, only around 29% of the decisions in the financial market are made based on data.

The second keynote speaker was John Sheridan, the digital director of The National Archives in UK. While giving a nice overview of the British history, he talked about how semantic technologies are used to preserve the history at The National Archives in UK, in a talk entitled “Semantic Web technologies for Digital Archives”. Nowadays, semantic technologies are used at large in order to make the cultural heritage collections publicly available online. However, people still struggle to search and browse through archives without having the context of the data. As a take home message, we need to work towards the second generation digital archives that should measure risks, provide trust evidence, redefine context, embrace uncertainty, enable use and access.

In the last day of the conference Lora Aroyo gave her keynote presentation, “Disrupting the Semantic Comfort Zone”. Lora started her keynote by looking back into the history of Semantic Web and AI and how her own journey embraced the changes along the way. Something was clear: the humans were always in the centre and they still continue to be. The second part of the presentation focused on introducing the underlying idea of the CrowdTruth project. As a final note, I’ll leave here the following question from Lora: “Will the next AI winter be the winter of human intelligence or not?”

NLP & ML Tracks

Federico Bianchi presented during the ML track an approach that uses active learning to rank semantic associations. The problem is well-known, we have an information overload in contextual KB exploration and even for small amounts of texts there is a lot of data to be considered. In order to determine which semantic associations are most interesting to users, Actively Learning to Rank Semantic Associations for Personalized Contextual Exploration of Knowledge Graphs defines a ranking function based on a serendipity heuristic, i.e., relevance and unexpectedness.

The paper “All that Glitters Is Not Gold – Rule-Based Curation of Reference Datasets for Named Entity Recognition and Entity Linking” by Kunal Jha, Michael Röder and Axel-Cyrille Ngonga Ngomo draws the attention over the current gold standards and makes similar claims as the ones we presented in our paper: the gold standards for not share a common set of rules for annotating named entities, they are not thoroughly checked and they are not refined and updated to newer versions. Thus, the need for the EAGLET benchmark curation tool for named entities!

Using semantic annotations for providing a better access to scientific publications is a subject that nowadays caught the attention of many researchers. Sepideh Mesbah, PhD student at Delft University of Technology presented “Semantic Annotation of Data Processing Pipelines in Scientific Publications”, a paper that proposes an approach and workflow for extracting semantically rich metadata from scientific publications, by classifying the content of scientific publications and extracting the named entities (objectives, datasets, methods, software, results).

Jose G. Moreno presented the paper “Combining Word and Entity Embeddings for Entity Linking” which introduces a natural idea for entity linking by using a combination of entity and word embeddings. The claims of the authors are the following: you shall know a word by the company it keeps and you shall know an entity by the company it keeps in a KB, word context by alignment, word/entity context by concatenation.

Social Media Track

The Social Media track started with a presentation by Hassan Saif – “A Semantic Graph-based Approach for Radicalisation Detection on Social Media”. The approach presented in the paper uses semantic graph representation in order to discover patterns among pro and anti ISIS users on social media. Overall, pro-ISIS users tend to discuss about religion, historical events and ethnicity, while anti-ISIS users focus more on politics, geographical locations and intervention against ISIS. The second presentation – “Crowdsourced Affinity: A Matter of Fact or Experience” by Chun Lu – took us in a different domain – a travel destination recommendation scenario that is based on a user-entity affinity, i.e., the likelihood of a user to be attracted by an entity (book film, artist) or to perform an ection (click, purchase, like, share). The main finding of the paper was that in general, a knowledge graph helps to assess more accurately the affinity, while a folksonomy helps to increase its diversity and novelty. The Social Media Track had two papers nominated for best student research paper – the aforementioned paper and the paper “Linked Data Notifications” presented by Sarven Capadisli, Amy Guy, Christoph Lange, Sören Auer, Andrei Sambra and Tim Berners-Lee. The latter was also the winner!

Best student paper award of #eswc2017 goes to @csarven and @rhiaro for Linked Data Notifications pic.twitter.com/7eZauUW6n1

June 1, 2017

In-Use and Industrial Track

Social media was highly relevant for the In-Use track as well. The Swiss Armed Forces is developing a Social Media Analysis system aiming to detect events such as natural disasters and terrorists activity by performing semantic tweet analysis. If you want to know more, you can the paper “ArmaTweet: Detecting Events by Semantic Tweet Analysis”. This track has as well nominations for best in-use paper. The winning paper in this category was “smartAPI: Towards a More Intelligent Network of Web APIs”, presented by Amrapali Zaveri.

Won the best in-use paper award for our #smartAPI work! Congrats to all co-authors! #eswc2017 #api #FAIR pic.twitter.com/FKzAgwuzFU

— Amrapali Zaveri (@AmrapaliZ) June 1, 2017

Open Knowledge Extraction Challenge

During the Open Knowledge Extraction challenge, Raphaël Troncy presented the participating system ADEL – an adaptable entity extraction and linking framework, also the challenge winning entry. The ADEL framework can be adapted to a variety of different generic or specific entity types that need to be extracted, as well as to different knowledge bases to be disambiguated to, such as DBpedia and MusicBrainz). Overall, this self-configurable system tries to solve a difficult problem with current NER tools, i.e., the fact that they are only tailored for specific data, scenarios and applications.

OKE Challenge winner @ #eswc2017 #oke2017 #benchmarking #bigdata #linkeddata #semanticweb #H2020 https://t.co/Uo4cWeFStS pic.twitter.com/mybaguTdOe

— Project HOBBIT (@hobbit_project) June 2, 2017

Workshops

On Monday, during the second day of workshops I attended two workshops, 3rd international workshop on Semantic Web for Scientific Heritage, SW4SH 2017 and Semantic Deep Learning, SemDeep-17, now at the first edition. During the SW4SH 2017 workshop, Francesco Beretta had a detailed keynote, entitled “Collaboratively Producing Interoperable Ontologies and Semantically Annotated Corpora” in which he presented a couple of projects for digital humanities (symogih.org, the corpus analysis environment TXM, among others) and how linked (open) data, ontologies, automated tools for natural language processing and semantics are finding their place in the daily projects of humanities scholars. However, all these tools, approaches and technologies are not 100% embraced, as humanities scholars are seldom content with precision values of 90% and they feel the urge of manually tweak the data, until it looks perfect.

During SemDeep-17, Sergio Oramas presented the paper “ELMDist: A vector space model with words and MusicBrainz entities”. This article makes it clear that it’s still unclear how NLP and semantic technologies can contribute in Music Information Retrieval areas such as music and artist recommendation and similarity. The approach presented uses NLP processing in order to disambiguate the entities from the musical texts and then runs the word2vec algorithm over this sense level space. Overall, their results show promising results, meaning that textual descriptions can be used in order to improve the Music Information Retrieval area. The last paper of the workshop, “On Semantics and Deep Learning for Event Detection in Crisis Situations”, was presented by Hassan Saif. As the title suggests, the paper tries to solve the problem of event detection in crisis situations from social media, using Dual-CNN, a semantically-enhanceddeep learning model. Altought the model has successful results in identifying the existence of events and their types, its performance drops significantly when identifying event-related information such as the number of people affected, total damages.

Posted in CrowdTruth, Projects