Preview: ISWC 2015 Data & Ontologies Track

Next week is the 2015 International Semantic Web Conference. I had the opportunity with the Michel Dumontier to chair a new track on Datasets and Ontologies. A key part of of the Semantic Web has always been shared resources, whether it’s common standards through the W3C or open datasets like those found in the LOD cloud. Indeed, one of the major successes of our community is the availability of these resources.

ISWC over the years has experimented with different ways of highlighting these contributions and bringing them into the scientific literature. For the past couple of years, we have had an evaluation track specifically devoted to reproducibility and evaluation studies. Last year datasets were included to form a larger RDBS track. This year we again have a specific Empirical Studies and Evaluation track along side the Data & Ontologies track.

The reviewers had a tough job for this track. First, it was new so it’s hard to make a standard judgment. Secondly, we asked reviewers not only to review the paper but the resource itself along a number of dimensions. Overall, I think they did a good job. Below you’ll find the resources chosen for presentation at the conference and a brief headline of what to me is interesting about the paper. In the spirt of the track, I link to the resource as well as the paper.

Datasets

  •  Automatic Curation of Clinical Trials Data in LinkedCT by Oktie Hassanzadeh and Renée J Miller (paper) – clinicaltrials.gov published as linked data in an open and queryable. This resource has been around since 2008. I love the fact that they post downtime and other status info on twitter https://twitter.com/linkedct
  • LSQ: Linked SPARQL Queries Dataset by Muhammad Saleem, Muhammad Intizar Ali, Qaiser Mehmood, Aidan Hogan and Axel-Cyrille Ngonga Ngomo (paper). – Query logs are becoming an ever more important resource from everything from search engines to database query optimization. See for example USEWOD. This resource provides queryable versions in SPARQL of the query logs from several major datasets including dbpedia and linked geo data.
  • Provenance-Centered Dataset of Drug-Drug Interactions by Juan Banda, Tobias Kuhn, Nigam Shah and Michel Dumontier (paper) – this resources provides aggregated set of drug-drug interactions coming from 8 different sources. I like how they provided a doi for the bulk download of their datasource as well as spraql endpoint. It also uses nanopublications as the representation format.
  • Semantic Bridges for Biodiversity Science by Natalia Villanueva-Rosales, Nicholas Del Rio, Deana Pennington and Luis Garnica Chavira (paper) – this resource allows biodiversity scientist to work with species distribution models. The interesting thing about this resource is that it not only provides linked data, a spraql endpoint and ontologies but also semantic web services (i.e. SADI) for orchestrating these models.
  • DBpedia Commons: Structured Multimedia Metadata for Wikimedia Commons by Gaurav Vaidya, Dimitris Kontokostas, Magnus Knuth, Jens Lehmann and Sebastian Hellmann  (paper) – this is another chapter in exposing wikimedia content as structured data. This resource provides structured information for the media content in Wikimedia commons. Now you can spraql for all images with a CC-by-sa v2.0 license.

Ontologies

Overall, I think this is a good representation of the plethora of deep datasets and ontologies that the community is creating.  Take a minute and check out these new resources.

Filed under: academia, events, linked data Tagged: #iswc2015, data, linked data, ontologies
Source: Think Links

Posted in Paul Groth, Staff Blogs

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