Trip Report: Provenance Week 2018

A couple of weeks ago I was at Provenance Week 2018 – a biennial conference that brings together various communities working on data provenance. Personally, it’s a fantastic event as it’s an opportunity to see the range of work going on from provenance in astronomy data to the newest work on database theory for provenance. Bringing together these various strands is important as there is work from across computer science that touches on data provenance.

James Cheney's TaPP keynote. Different flavors of provenance. #provenanceweek .. pic.twitter.com/OdFCqKQCGs

— Bertram Ludäscher (@ludaesch) July 11, 2018

The week is anchored by the International Provenance and Annotation Workshop (IPAW) and the Theory and Practice of Provenance (TaPP) and includes events focused on emerging areas of interest including incremental re-computation , provenance-based security and algorithmic accountability. There were 90 attendees up from ~60 in the prior events and here they are:

IMG_0626-2.jpg

The folks at Kings College London, led by Vasa Curcin, did a fantastic job of organizing the event including great social outings on-top of their department building and with a boat ride along the thames. They also catered to the world cup fans as well. Thanks Vasa!

2018-07-11 21.29.07

I had the following major takeaways from the conference:

Improved Capture Systems

The two years since the last provenance week have seen a number of improved systems for capturing provenance. In the systems setting, DARPAs Transparent Computing program has given a boost to scaling out provenance capture systems. These systems use deep operating system instrumentation to capture logs over the past several years these have become more efficient and scalable e.g. Camflow, SPADE. This connects with the work we’ve been doing on improving capture using whole system record-and-replay. You  can now run these systems almost full-time although they capture significant amounts of data (3 days = ~110 GB). Indeed, the folks at Galois presented an impressive looking graph database specifically focused on working with provenance and time series data streaming from these systems.

Beyond the security use case, sciunit.run was a a neat tool using execution traces to produce reproducible computational experiments.

There were also a number of systems for improving the generation of instrumentation to capture provenance. UML2PROV automatically generates provenance instrumentation from UML diagrams and source code using the provenance templates approach. (Also used to capture provenance in an IoT setting.) Curator implements provenance capture for micro-services using existing logging libraries. Similarly, UNICORE now implements provenance for its HPC environment. I still believe structured logging is one of the under rated ways of integrating provenance capture into systems.

Finally, there was some interesting work on reconstructing provenance. In particular, I liked Alexander Rasin‘s work on reconstructing the contents of a database from its environment to answer provenance queries:2018-07-10 16.34.08.jpg

Also, the IPAW best paper looked at using annotations in a workflow to infer dependency relations:

Kudos to Shawn and Tim for combining theory & practice (logic inference & #YesWorkflow) in powerful new ways! #IPAW2018 Best Paper is available here: https://t.co/te3ce7mV6Y https://t.co/WT0F0PcMz7

— Bertram Ludäscher (@ludaesch) July 27, 2018

Lastly, there was some initial work on extracting provenance of  health studies directly from published literature which I thought was a interesting way of recovering provenance.

Provenance for Accountability

Another theme (mirrored by the event noted above) was the use of provenance for accountability. This has always been a major use for provenance as pointed out by Bertram Ludäscher in his keynote:

The need for knowing where your data comes from all the way from 1929 @ludaesch #provenanceweek https://t.co/TIgPEOFjxb pic.twitter.com/2NpbSMI699

— Paul Groth (@pgroth) July 9, 2018

However, I think due to increasing awareness around personal data usage and privacy the need for provenance is being recognized. See, for example, the Royal Society’s report on Data management and use: Governance in the 21st century. At Provenance Week, there were several papers addressing provenance for GDPR, see:

I'd like to shamelessly pitch our GDPRov ontology as a superset of this work. The key difference here being justification is used as a legal concept. We use hasLegalBasis as a property. https://t.co/W4V9r2QXwA

— Harshvardhan Pandit (@coolharsh55) July 10, 2018

Also, the I was impressed with the demo from Imosphere using provenance for accountability and trust in health data:

Great to be part of #provenanceweek at @KingsCollegeLon, here's Anthony @ScampDoodle demonstrating the data provenance functionality within Atmolytics at yesterday's sessions. To learn more about the benefits of data provenance in analytics go to https://t.co/8NdmN2ECrP pic.twitter.com/ueDQUi7jSG

— Imosphere (@Imosphere) July 11, 2018

Re-computation & Its Applications

Using provenance to determine what to recompute seems to have a number of interesting applications in different domains. Paolo Missier showed for example how it can be used to determine when to recompute in next generation sequencing pipelines.

Our #provenanceWeek IPAW 2018 conference paper on using provenance to facilitate re-computation analysis in the ReComp project. Link to paper: here: https://t.co/zeZ9xROm2S
Link to presentation: https://t.co/w6cVwpdLGT

— Paolo Missier (@PMissier) July 9, 2018

I particular liked their notion of a re-computation front – what set of past executions do you need to re-execute in order to address the change in data.

Wrattler was a neat extension of the computational notebook idea that showed how provenance can be used to automatically propagate changes through notebook executions and support suggestions.

Marta Mattoso‘s team discussed the application of provenance to track the adjustments when performing steering of executions in complex HPC applications.

The work of Melanie Herschel‘s team on provenance for data integration points to the benefits of potentially applying recomputation using provenance to make the iterative nature of data integration speedier as she enumerated in her presentation at the recomputation worskhop.2018-07-12 15.01.42.jpg

You can see all the abstracts from the workshop here. I understand from Paolo that they will produce a report from the discussions there.

Overall, I left provenance week encouraged by the state of the community, the number of interesting application areas, and the plethora of research questions to work on.

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Testimonials Digital Humanities minor at DHBenelux2018

At the DHBenelux 2018 conference, students from the VU minor “Digital Humanities and Social Analytics” presented their final DH in Practice work. In this video, the students talk about their experience in the minor and the internship projects. We also meet other participants of the conference talking about the need for interdisciplinary research.

 

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Big Data Europe Project ended

All good things come to an end, and that also holds for our great Horizon2020 project “Big Data Europe“, in which we collaborated with a broad range of techincal and domain partners to develop (Semantic) Big Data infrastructure for a variety of domains. VU was involved as work package leader in the Pilot and Evaluation work package and co-developed methods to test and apply the BDE stack in Health, Traffic, Security and other domains..

You can read more about the end of the project in this blog post at the BDE website.

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André Baart and Kasadaka win IXA High Potential Award

Andre and his prizeOn 19 June, André Baart was awarded the High Potential Award at the Amsterdam Science & Innovation en Impact Awards for his and W4RA‘s work on the Kasadaka platform.

Kasadaka (“talking box”) is an ICT for Development (ICT4D) platform to develop voice-based technologies for those who are not connected to the Internet, cannot not read and write, and speak underresourced languages.

As part of a longer-term project, the Kasadaka Voice platform and software development kit (VSDK), has been developed by André Baart as part of his BSc and MSc research at VU. In that context it has been extensively tested in the field, for example by Adama Tessougué, journalist and founder of radio Sikidolo in Konobougou, a small village in rural Mali. It was also evaluated in the context of the ICT4D course at VU, by 46 master students from Computer Science, Information Science and Artificial Intelligence. The Kasadaka is now in Sarawak Malaysia, where it will be soon deployed in a Kampong, by Dr. Cheah Waishiang, ICT4D researcher at the University of Malasia Sarawak (UNIMAS), and students from VU and UNIMAS.

André is currently pursuing his PhD in ICT4D at Universiteit van Amsterdam and still member of the W4RA team.

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A Brief Trip Report from WebSci 2018

The early part of last week I attended the Web Science 2018 conference. It was hosted here in Amsterdam which was nice for me. It was nice to be at a conference where I could go home in the evening.

Web Science is an interesting research area in that it treats the Web itself as an object of study. It’s a highly interdisciplinary area that combines primarily social science with computer science. I always envision it as a loop with studies of what’s actually going on the Web leading to new interventions on the Web which we then need to study.

There were what I guess a hundred or so people there … it’s a small but fun community. I won’t give a complete rundown of the conference. You can find summaries of each day done by Cat Morgan (Workshop DayDay 1Day 2Day 3) but instead give an assortment of things that stuck out for me:

And some tweets:

The crowd waiting for @timberners_lee Turing Lecture is insane! #WebSci18 pic.twitter.com/2jpdVQZ3sV

— Roy Lee (@SRoyLee) May 29, 2018

Just like Global Warming, Facebook is anthropogenic – humans created it and it’s a lot easier to change (than global warming). You have an obligation to replace and fix it — and it’s an interdisciplinary endeavour to guide us on how #WebSci18 #turingaward @timberners_lee pic.twitter.com/0zm2EdC38d

— electronic max (@emax) May 29, 2018

It's amazing to consider that something so profoundly simple (the humble URL), can be so powerful, and of course, scalable. At the same time, smart people still struggle to grock this concept. #WebSci18 #webscience @W3C #linkeddata https://t.co/a2XrydT3Sm

— Bernadette Hyland (@BernHyland) May 29, 2018

Find more details in the paper https://t.co/fV5LYxFd1N https://t.co/mckKs7doGp

— metrics-project (@metrics_project) May 28, 2018

Lots of case studies here at #websci18 – always highly interesting but I’m wondering about generalizability – maybe need websci meta reviews? https://t.co/4cY4pIdfcS

— Paul Groth (@pgroth) May 30, 2018

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Presenting the CARPA project

The ICT4D project CARPA, funded by NWO-WOTRO had its first stakeholder workshop today at the Amsterdam Business School of UvA. From our project proposal: The context for CARPA (Crowdsourcing App for Responsible Production in Africa) lies in sustainable and responsible business. Firms are under increasing pressure to ensure sustainable, responsible production in their supply chains.. Lack of transparency about labour abuses and environmental damages has led some firms to cease purchases from the region

The first stakeholder workshop at #UvA of #CAPRA project on developing an #ict4d crowdsourcing app for responsible production in #Africa #NWO#WOTRO @AndreBaart @marcelworring pic.twitter.com/sgfTb2P2XE

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) May 15, 2018

.With an interdisciplinary partnership of local NGOs and universities in DRC, Mali, and South Africa, this project aims to generate new evidence-based knowledge to improve transparency about business impacts on responsible production.

Co-creating a smartphone application, we will use crowdsourcing methods to obtain reports of negative social and environmental business impacts in these regions, and follow them over time to understand access to justice and whether and how remediation of such impacts occurs. Data integration and visualization methods will identify patterns in order to provide context and clarity about business impacts on sustainability over time. A website will be developed to provide ongoing public access to this data, including a mapping function pinpointing impact locations.

The project will be led by Michelle Westermann-Behaylo from UvA, with the research work on the ground being executed by UvA’s Francois Lenfant and Andre Baart. Marcel Worring and myself are involved in supervisory roles.

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Presenting the CARPA project

The ICT4D project CARPA, funded by NWO-WOTRO had its first stakeholder workshop today at the Amsterdam Business School of UvA. From our project proposal: The context for CARPA (Crowdsourcing App for Responsible Production in Africa) lies in sustainable and responsible business. Firms are under increasing pressure to ensure sustainable, responsible production in their supply chains.. Lack of transparency about labour abuses and environmental damages has led some firms to cease purchases from the region

The first stakeholder workshop at #UvA of #CAPRA project on developing an #ict4d crowdsourcing app for responsible production in #Africa #NWO#WOTRO @AndreBaart @marcelworring pic.twitter.com/sgfTb2P2XE

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) May 15, 2018

.With an interdisciplinary partnership of local NGOs and universities in DRC, Mali, and South Africa, this project aims to generate new evidence-based knowledge to improve transparency about business impacts on responsible production.

Co-creating a smartphone application, we will use crowdsourcing methods to obtain reports of negative social and environmental business impacts in these regions, and follow them over time to understand access to justice and whether and how remediation of such impacts occurs. Data integration and visualization methods will identify patterns in order to provide context and clarity about business impacts on sustainability over time. A website will be developed to provide ongoing public access to this data, including a mapping function pinpointing impact locations.

The project will be led by Michelle Westermann-Behaylo from UvA, with the research work on the ground being executed by UvA’s Francois Lenfant and Andre Baart. Marcel Worring and myself are involved in supervisory roles.

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Trip Report: WebConf 2018

I had the pleasure of attending the Web Conference 2018 in Lyon last week along with my colleague Corey Harper . This is the 27th addition of the largest conference on the World Wide Web. I have tremendous difficulty  not calling it WWW but I’ll learn! Instead of doing two trip reports the rest of this is a combo of Corey and my thoughts. Before getting to what we took away as main themes of the conference let’s look at the stats and organization:

Opening ceremony at #TheWebConf @TheWebConf 2018 in Lyon France. General acceptance rate 15%, check the detailed track acceptance rate for detailed information. A+ conference, very competitive. pic.twitter.com/WmPq0TGjIc

— Claudia De Los Rios Perez – cladep (@cladep1) April 25, 2018

It’s also worth pointing out that this is just the research track. There were 27 workshops,  21 tutorials, 30 demos (Paul was co-chair), 62 posters, four collocated conferences/events, 4 challenges, a developer track and programming track, a project track, an industry track, and… We are probably missing something as well. Suffice to say, even with the best work of the organizers it was hard to figure out what to see. Organizing an event with 2200+ attendees is a thing is a massive task – over 80 chairs were involved not to mention the PC and the local heavy lifting. Congrats to Fabien, Pierre-Antoine, Lionel and the whole committee for pulling it off.  It’s also great to see as well that the proceedings are open access and available on the web.

This is what it takes to run a Web conference of 2,300 people #TheWebConf pic.twitter.com/cenw61WIQG

— Wendy Hall (@DameWendyDBE) April 27, 2018

Given the breadth of the conference, we obviously couldn’t see everything but from our interests we pulled out the following themes:

  • Dealing with a Polluted Web
  • Tackling Tabular Data
  • Observational Methods
  • Scientific Content as a Driver

Dealing with a Polluted Web

The Web community is really owning it’s responsibility to help mitigate the destructive uses to which the Web is put. From the “Recoding Black Mirror” workshop, which we were sad to miss, through the opening keynote and the tracks on Security and Privacy and Fact Checking, this was a major topic throughout the conference.

Oxford professor Luciano Floridi gave an excellent first keynote  on “The Good Web” which addressed this topic head on. He introduced a number of nice metaphors to describe what’s going on:

  • Polluting agents in the Web ecosystem are like extremphiles, making the environment hostile to all but themselves
  • Democracy in some contexts can be like antibiotics: too much gives growth to antibiotic resistant bacteria.
  • His takeaway is that we need a bit of paternalism in this context now.

His talk was pretty compelling,  you can check out the full video here.

Additionally, Corey was able to attend the panel discussion that opened the “Journalism, Misinformation, and Fact-Checking” track, which included representation from the Credibility Coalition, the International Fact Checking Network, MIT, and WikiMedia. There was a discussion of how to set up economies of trust in the age of attention economies, and while some panelists agreed with Floridi’s call for some paternalism, there was also a warning that some techniques we might deploy to mitigate these risks could lead to “accidental authoritarianism.” The Credibility Coalition also provided an interesting review of how to define credibility indicators for news looking at over 16 indicators of credibility.

We were able to see parts of the “Web and Society track”, which included a number of papers related to social justice oriented themes. This included an excellent paper that showed how recommender systems in social networks often exacerbate and amplify gender and racial disparity in social network connections and engagement. Additionally, many papers addressed the relationship between the mainstream media and the web. (e.g. political polarization and social media, media and public attention using the web).

Some more examples: The best demo was awarded to a system that automatically analyzed privacy policies of websites and summarized them with respect to GDPR and:

presented at @TheWebConf today! spoiler alert: your secrets are not safe, so do not "browse like no one's watching".

full paper here: https://t.co/PIJKRx13dp #TheWebConf pic.twitter.com/KCwNKkNGiI

— uc (@yuxiwu) April 26, 2018

More generally, it seems the question is how do we achieve quality assessment at scale?

Tackling Tabular Data

Knowledge graphs and heterogenous networks (there was a workshop on that) were a big part of the conference. Indeed the test of time paper award went to the original Yago paper. There were a number of talks about improving knowledge graphs for example for improving on question answering tasks, determining attributes that are needed to complete a KG or improving relation extraction. While tables have always been an input to knowledge graph construction (e.g. wikpedia infoboxes), an interesting turn was towards treating tabular data as a focus area.

As Natasha Noy from Google noted in her  keynote at the SAVE-SD workshop,  this is an area with a number of exciting research challenges:img_0034_google_savesd.jpg

There was a workshop on data search with a number of papers on the theme. In that workshop, Maarten de Rijke gave a keynote on the work his team has been doing in the context of data search project with Elsevier.

In the main track, there was an excellent talk on Ad-Hoc Table Retrieval using Semantic Similarity. They looked at finding semantically central columns to provide a rank list of columns. More broadly they are looking at spreadsheet compilation as the task (see smarttables.cc and the dataset for that task.) Furthermore, the paper Towards Annotating Relational Data on the Web with Language Models looked at enriching tables through linking into a knowledge graph.

Observational Methods

Observing  user behavior has been a part of research on the Web, any web search engine is driven by that notion. What did seem to be striking is the depth of the observational data being employed. Prof. Lorrie Cranor gave an excellent keynote on the user experience of web security (video here). Did you know that if you read all the privacy policies of all the sites you visit it wold take 244 hours per year? Also, the idea of privacy as nutrition labels is pretty cool:

@lorrietweet talking about the advantages of privacy labels modeled after nutrition labels #thewebconf pic.twitter.com/CCGYd75k2p

— Paul Groth (@pgroth) April 27, 2018

But what was interesting was her labs use of an observatory of 200 participants who allowed their Windows home computers to be instrumented. This kind of instrumentation gives deep insight into how users actually use their browsers and security settings.

Another example of deep observational data, was the use of mouse tracking on search result pages to detect how people search under anxiety conditions:

Important work – on mouse tracking of search for people under anxiety – but brings a lot of ethical questions https://t.co/D4SUUg4tec @MSFTResearch #TheWebConf pic.twitter.com/91W03CzWpS

— Paul Groth (@pgroth) April 25, 2018

In the paper by Wei Sui and co-authors on Computational Creative Advertisements presented at the HumL workshop – they use in-home facial and video tracking to measure emotional response to ads by volunteers.

The final example was the use of FMRI scans to track brain activity of participants during web search tasks. All these examples provide amazing insights into how people use these technologies but as these sorts of methods are more broadly adopted, we need to make sure to adopt the kinds of safe-guards adopted by these researchers – e.g. consent, IRBs, anonymization.

Scientific Content as a Driver

It’s probably our bias but we saw a lot of work tackling scientific content. Probably because it’s both interesting and provides a number of challenges. For example, the best paper of the conference (HighLife) was about extracting n-ary relations for knowledge graph construction motivated by the need for such types of relations in creating biomedical knowledge graphs. The aforementioned work on tabular data often is motivated by the needs of research. Obviously SAVE-SD covered this in detail:

In the demo track, the etymo.io search engine was presented to summarize and visualization of scientific papers. Kuansan Wang at the BigNet workshop talked about Microsoft Academic Search and the difficulties and opportunities in processing so much scientific data.

IMG_0495.JPG

Paul gave a keynote at the same workshop also using science as the motivation for new methods for building out knowledge graphs. Slides below:

In the panel, Structured Data on the Web 7.0, Google’s Evgeniy Gabrilovich – creator of the Knowledge Vote – noted the challenges of getting highly correct data for Google’s Medical Knowledge graph and that doing this automatically is still difficult.

Finally, using DOIs for studying persistent identifier use over time on the Web.

Wrap-up

Overall, we had a fantastic web conference. Good research, good conversations and good food:

An amazing #dinerdegala at #TheWebConf with privatization of @LesHallesdeLyon. As a lyonnaise I’ve never seen that, it wa so delicious ! pic.twitter.com/vfcGHLtUe0

— Maud Charaf (@maudcharaf) April 27, 2018

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A look back at UCDS at ICT.Open2018

Two weeks ago, ICT.Open2018 was held in Amersfoort. This event brings together Computer Science researchers from all over the Netherlands and our research group was present with many posters and presentations.

We even won a prize! (Well, a 2nd place prize, but awesome nonetheless). Xander Wilcke presented work on using Knowledge Graphs for Machine Learning. He was awarded the runner-up prize for best poster presentation at ICTOpen2018. Congrats!

The knowledge graph for end-to-end learning poster at #ictopen2018 check it out at stand nr 4 @UserCentricDS pic.twitter.com/3INrp63lN9

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) March 19, 2018

 

Ronald Siebes presented work in the ArchiMediaL project on reconstructing 4D street views from historical images.

Let Ronald Siebes tell you all about reconstructing #4D street views from historical image collections, as proposed by #ArchiMediaL @VU_Science @tudelft @UserCentricDS pic.twitter.com/6WQUGta4VC

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) March 20, 2018

Oana Inel presented her work on Named Entity Recognition and Gold Standard critiquing. She also demonstrated the Clariah MediaSuite.

@oana_inel shows that 'gold standards' in NER might not be gold, nor standard. #ICTOPEN2018 @UserCentricDS @VU_Science #crowdtruth pic.twitter.com/cSRIH3YUS7

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) March 19, 2018

Advanced digital data services for media scholars: @oana_inel demonstrating the @CLARIAH_NL MediaSuite at #ictopen2018 @VU_Science @benglabs #clariah #digitalhumanities pic.twitter.com/K6wzGFdHFR

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) March 19, 2018

Anca Dumitrache talked about using crowdsourcing as part of the Machine Learning life cycle.

@anca_dmtrch proposes #crowdsourcing to fix errors in distant supervision data in the machine learning session at #ICTOPEN2018 #crowdtruth @UserCentricDS @VU_Science pic.twitter.com/2QXNcSkdRN

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) March 19, 2018

Tobias Kuhn talked about Reliable Granular References to Changing Linked Data, which was previously published at ISWC2017.

Cristina Bucur introduced  Linkflows: enabling a web of linked semantic publishing workflows

I talked myself a bit about current work in the ABC-Kb Network Institute project

@victordeboer presenting "UX Challenges of information organization: the assessment of language impairment in bilingual children" @ #ictopen2018 @networkinstvu @UserCentricDS @VU_Science pic.twitter.com/2CY4esa4vy

— Oana Inel (@oana_inel) March 20, 2018

All in all, this was quite a nice edition of the yearly event for our group. See you next year in Amersfoort!

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A look back at UCDS at ICT.Open2018

Two weeks ago, ICT.Open2018 was held in Amersfoort. This event brings together Computer Science researchers from all over the Netherlands and our research group was present with many posters and presentations.

We even won a prize! (Well, a 2nd place prize, but awesome nonetheless). Xander Wilcke presented work on using Knowledge Graphs for Machine Learning. He was awarded the runner-up prize for best poster presentation at ICTOpen2018. Congrats!

The knowledge graph for end-to-end learning poster at #ictopen2018 check it out at stand nr 4 @UserCentricDS pic.twitter.com/3INrp63lN9

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) March 19, 2018

 

Ronald Siebes presented work in the ArchiMediaL project on reconstructing 4D street views from historical images.

Let Ronald Siebes tell you all about reconstructing #4D street views from historical image collections, as proposed by #ArchiMediaL @VU_Science @tudelft @UserCentricDS pic.twitter.com/6WQUGta4VC

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) March 20, 2018

Oana Inel presented her work on Named Entity Recognition and Gold Standard critiquing. She also demonstrated the Clariah MediaSuite.

@oana_inel shows that 'gold standards' in NER might not be gold, nor standard. #ICTOPEN2018 @UserCentricDS @VU_Science #crowdtruth pic.twitter.com/cSRIH3YUS7

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) March 19, 2018

Advanced digital data services for media scholars: @oana_inel demonstrating the @CLARIAH_NL MediaSuite at #ictopen2018 @VU_Science @benglabs #clariah #digitalhumanities pic.twitter.com/K6wzGFdHFR

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) March 19, 2018

Anca Dumitrache talked about using crowdsourcing as part of the Machine Learning life cycle.

@anca_dmtrch proposes #crowdsourcing to fix errors in distant supervision data in the machine learning session at #ICTOPEN2018 #crowdtruth @UserCentricDS @VU_Science pic.twitter.com/2QXNcSkdRN

— Victor de Boer (@victordeboer) March 19, 2018

Tobias Kuhn talked about Reliable Granular References to Changing Linked Data, which was previously published at ISWC2017.

Cristina Bucur introduced  Linkflows: enabling a web of linked semantic publishing workflows

I talked myself a bit about current work in the ABC-Kb Network Institute project

@victordeboer presenting "UX Challenges of information organization: the assessment of language impairment in bilingual children" @ #ictopen2018 @networkinstvu @UserCentricDS @VU_Science pic.twitter.com/2CY4esa4vy

— Oana Inel (@oana_inel) March 20, 2018

All in all, this was quite a nice edition of the yearly event for our group. See you next year in Amersfoort!

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